Canberra

A whole month in Canberra…to see very little.  The nights were so cold, and it took so long to warm up, that I think we actually started to hibernate.  Even the little ones were sleeping in till 11am.  One night we even tried sleeping six people in a queen size bed to try and keep each other warm…it didn’t work.

Oh, we did a little sight-seeing like Parliament House and the War Memorial.  And saw lots and lots of kangaroos.

 

The next morning when we opened our eyes we were parked in a rest area just off the road with a constant stream of noisy cars and trucks.

“Where are we, Mum?” Lucy yawned.

“We’re just out of Canberra. This is the Burton Highway, named after Australia’s first prime minister.”

We had a late breakfast and then found that we had stopped only ten minutes from the border of the ACT last night. We drove through roundabout after roundabout on wide streets.

“Look!” Pointed Peter, as he viewed Parliament House for the first time.

We drove out to near the New South Wales border to a park there to camp in.The kids voted to park in the car park next to the playground and toilets, but Dad wanted to park in a quiet section near a tap he saw. “Let the kids, it’s a lovely playground and they’ll be able to play a lot if we’re near it.” Mum regretted this as everyone felt the need to stare at us unabashedly and we had the uncomfortable sensation of being a museum exhibit. Thus, after the first week we moved to Dad’s area.

It was bitterly cold in Canberra. Winter had not yet officially arrived, but the nights were below zero. We all slept a lot to try and keep warm, not seeing much of the ACT as we slept in so late each day. Dad installed a new diesel heater on our last day there.

We walked around Parliament House then did a tour with a guide who talked in a monotone so it was hard to stay focussed and listen to her. We were all disappointed that Parliament was neither sitting nor due to sit while we were there. After our tour, Mum told the kids to roll down the grass on the side of Parliament House. We walked across to the Old Parliament House that had been turned into a museum. The kids tried to find clues to create a hidden word and read every sign looking for their clues.

The Shrine of Remembrance was another stop we made as we wandered around the solemn memorial.

“I remember what the poppies are for,” said Susan.

“The red is for blood, the black is for the soil…” started Peter

“And they were the first flowers to regrow in the trenches in France after some war.” Susaninterrupted, determined not to lose her credit.

“World War 1.” Peter corrected.

At closing time they had a small ceremony and we listened as a man in a kilt played the bagpipes.

Travelling Australia in a campervan since 2009 with our four children aged 4, 7, 10, and 11. We are a family living on the road. Stopping to work in rural and remote towns as we need more money, we love this lifestyle. The four kids are homeschooled as we work our way slowly around Australia.

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About Amy and Jarrad

Travelling Australia in a campervan since 2009 with our four children aged 4, 7, 10, and 11. We are a family living on the road.
Stopping to work in rural and remote towns as we need more money, we love this lifestyle. The four kids are homeschooled as we work our way slowly around Australia.

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